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The Transitionals


The first stamps in which the bluing was completely eliminated are called the Transitional Issues. The bluing was possibly removed by the elimination of prussiate of potash or the introduction of a neutralizing agent.  If a neutralizing agent was in fact used this may account for the cream color which is apparent on these stamps.  The stamps appear in 1857 in various shades: orange-brown, red-orange, pale red and a range of pale rose.  Pale rose is the most common of the Transitional shades.  The stamps of the Transitional period are Die II, watermarked Large Crown type I, perforated 14, Alphabet III.  This Issue precedes the so called Rose Reds of 1856 to 1863.  Below are examples of the Transitionals.  I have also included examples of Plates 49 and 52 in in the scarce Pale rose on white paper in this section.
 


Pale Rose

Plate 43

Plate 52
Pale rose on
white paper

RPS #163524






 

Plate 52
Pale rose on
cream paper

RPS #163525






 

Plate 38


 

Plate 31

Plate 31

Plate 37

Pale rose on white paper Plate 49
 

Printings of Plate 49 in pale rose on white paper
are exceedingly scarce
 
 
 
 
 

Ranges of the Transitional Shades on Plate 40

Red orange

Orange red

Pale rose

Pale rose

Transitional Red Shades varying in depth

Plate 33

Plate 34

Plate 36

Plate 38


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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